S2.11 - Self-Regulation: Self-Monitoring, Self-Evaluation & Self-Reinforcement, Page 2

Self-Evaluation (Phases 2 & 3)

Self-evaluation consists of comparing a measure of some behavior or event with a goal or standard for the behavior or event (Agran, 1997). For example, you might record the amount of calories you eat each day and compare this to a standard or goal for calorie intake. There are several things to consider when establishing a goal or standard against which you want to compare yourself. Consider setting up a self-evaluation that:

Sometimes you just have to try it and then adjust your standard or goal as you need to! The first time is not always perfect.

Self-Reinforcement

Self-reinforcement is a way to pat yourself on the back for progress towards the goal or standard you have established. Self-reinforcement is an invaluable link between the response and the outcome. The more often that a person can pick out a target behavior and consistently give him or herself reinforcement for that behavior, the more likely it will occur in the future. (Wehmeyer, Agran, & Hughes, 1999). There are numerous ways to provide yourself with reinforcement. A few things include

Unfortunately, not all self-reinforcers are ideal in all situations. A self-reinforcer should be:

It is best to have self-reinforcement immediately follow self-evaluation. Make sure you do not forget this step!

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Web Resources

Inge, K. J., Johnston, C., & Sutphin, C. (2001). Method: Vocational options project. The application of self-management procedures to increase work production: A community-based case study example. Retrieved June 14, 2005, from Virginia commonwealth University, Rehabilitation Research & Training Center Web site: http://www.vcu.edu/rrtcweb/techlink/iandr/voproj/chap5/method.html

Inge, K. J., Johnston, C., & Sutphin, C. (2001). Job site training phases. Vocational options project: the application of self-management procedures in increase work production: A community-based case study example. Designing community-based vocational programs for students with severe disabilities [Monograph]. Retrieved June 14, 2005, from the Virginia Commonwealth University, Rehabilitation Research & Training Center Website: http://www.vcu.edu/rrtcweb/techlink/iandr/voproj/chap5/jobsite.html

Inge K. J. Inge & P. Sutphin, C., (n.d.). The application of a self-management procedure to increase work production: A community-based cse study example. [electronic version]. Designing community-based vocational programs for students with severe disabilities. Retrieved June 16, 2005 from the Virginia Commonwealth University, Rehabilitation Research & Training Center Website: http://www.vcu.edu/rrtcweb/techlink/iandr/voproj/chap5/intro.html

Inge, K. J., Johnston, C., & Sutphin, C. (2001). Vocational options project: The application of self-management procedures to increase work production: A community-based case study example: Summary. In K. J. Inge & P. Wehman (Eds.), Designing community-based vocational programs for students with severe disabilities [Monograph], (Chapter 5). Retrieved September 30, 2004 from the Virginia Commonwealth University, Rehab Research & Training Center Website: http://www.vcu.edu/rrtcweb/techlink/iandr/voproj/chap5/summary.html

Peterson, S. (2003). Teaching behavioral self-control. Retrieved April 22, 2003, from University of Florida, Multidisciplinary Diagnostic & Training Program Website: http://www.med.ufl.edu/mdtp/resources/TeachingBSC.htm

Syque. (2002-2005). Self-evaluation maintenance theory. Changing Minds.org. Retrieved September 30, 2004 from
http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/self-evaluation_maintenance.htm

Syque. (2002-2005). Self-monitoring behavior. Changing Minds.org. (n.d.). Retrieved June 14, 2005, from
http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/self-monitoring.htm

Snyder, Mark. (1974). Self monitoring scale. Retrieved September 30, 2004 from http://pubpages.unh.edu/~ckb/SELFMON2.html


References

Agran, M. (1997). Self-reinforcement. In M. Agran (Ed.), Student directed learning: Teaching self-determination skills (pp. 60-79). Pacific Grove, CA: Brook/Cole.

Agran, M., & Hughes, C. (1997). Self-monitoring. In M. Agran (Ed.), Student directed learning: Teaching self-determination skills (pp. 80-110). Pacific Grove, CA: Brook/Cole.

Agran, M., King-Sears, M. E., Wehmeyer, M., L., & Copland, S.R. (2003) Self-monitoring. In Teachers’ Guides to Inclusive Practices: Student Directed Learning (pp. 45-62). Baltimore, MD: Paul Brooks Publishing Co.

Smith, D. J., & Nelson, J. R. (1997) Goal setting, self-monitoring, and self-evaluation for students with disabilities. In M. Agran (Ed.), Student directed learning: Teaching self-determination skills (pp. 80-110). Pacific Grove, CA: Brook/Cole.

Wehmeyer, M. L., Agran, M., & Hughes, C. (1999). Teaching self-monitoring, self evaluation, and self-reinforcement strategies. In Teaching self-determination to students with disabilities: Basic skills for successful transitions (pp. 141-156). Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes.

Whitman, T. L. (1990). Development of self-regulation in persons with mental retardation. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 94 (4), 373-376.

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